Behavioral influences on the physiological responses of Cancer gracilis, the graceful crab, during hyposaline exposure

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Curtis, D. L., Jensen, E. K., & McGaw, I. J. (2007). Behavioral influences on the physiological responses of Cancer gracilis, the graceful crab, during hyposaline exposure. Biological Bulletin, 212(3), 222-231.
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TitleBehavioral influences on the physiological responses of Cancer gracilis, the graceful crab, during hyposaline exposure
AuthorsD. Curtis, E. Jensen, I. McGaw
AbstractThe relationship between the behavioral and physiological responses to hyposaline exposure was investigated in Cancer gracilis, the graceful crab. The status of C. gracilis as an osmoconformer was confirmed. Survival decreased with salinity: the LT50 in 50% seawater (a practical salinity of 16, or 16‰) was 31.5 ± 22.7 h and in 25% seawater (a salinity of 8) was 8.0 ± 0.7 h. When exposed to a salinity gradient, most crabs moved towards the highest salinity. However, in the salinity range of 55% to 65% seawater, they became quiescent. This "closure response" was also evident at low salinities: the mouthparts were tightly closed and animals remained motionless for 2 to 2.5 h. During closure, crabs were able to maintain the salinity of water within the branchial chambers at a level that was about 30% higher than that of the surrounding medium. The closure response was closely linked to a short-term decrease in oxygen uptake. During closure, oxygen within the branchial chamber was rapidly depleted, with oxygen uptake returning to pretreatment levels upon the resumption of activity. In addition to the short-term decrease in oxygen uptake, there was a longer-term bradycardia, which may serve to further reduce diffusive ion loss across the gills. By exhibiting a closure response during acute hyposaline exposure and an avoidance reaction during prolonged or severe hyposaline exposure, C. gracilis is able to use behavior to exploit areas prone to frequent episodes of low salinity. © 2007 Marine Biological Laboratory.
JournalBiological Bulletin
Date2007
Volume212
Issue3
Start page222
End page231
ISSN0006-3185
Subjectsoxygen, sea water, sodium chloride, behavioral response, crab, oxygen consumption, physiological response, pollution exposure, salinity tolerance, survival, animal, animal behavior, article, Brachyura, chemistry, drug effect, heart rate, hemolymph, metabolism, osmolarity, physiology, pressure, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Osmolar Concentration, Partial Pressure, Seawater, Animalia, Cancer gracilis, Decapoda (Crustacea)
NoteCited By (since 1996):7, Invertebrates, CODEN: BIBUB

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