Contaminant loads and hematological correlates in the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of San Francisco Bay, California

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Neale, J. C. C., Gulland, F. M. D., Schmelzer, K. R., Harvey, J. T., Berg, E. A., Allen, S. G., … Tjeerdema, R. S. (2005). Contaminant loads and hematological correlates in the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of San Francisco Bay, California. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A, 68(8), 617-633. doi:10.1080/15287390590921748
Metadata
TitleContaminant loads and hematological correlates in the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) of San Francisco Bay, California
AuthorsC. Neale, D. Gulland, R. Schmelzer, T. Harvey, A. Berg, G. Allen, J. Greig, K. Grigg, S. Tjeerdema
AbstractAn expanding body of research indicates that exposure to contaminants may impact marine mammal health, thus possibly contributing to population declines. The harbor seal population of the San Francisco Bay (SFB), California, has suffered habitat loss and degradation, including decades of environmental contamination. To explore the possibility of contaminant-induced health alterations in this population, blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were quantified in free-ranging seals; relationships between contaminant exposure and several key hematological parameters were examined; and PCB levels in the present study were compared with levels determined in SFB seals a decade earlier. PCB residues in harbor seal blood decreased during the past decade, but remained at levels great enough that adverse reproductive and immunological effects might be expected. Main results included a positive association between leukocyte counts and PBDEs, PCBs, and DDE in seals, and an inverse relationship between red blood cell count and PBDEs. Although not necessarily pathologic, these responses may serve as sentinel indications of contaminant-induced alterations in harbor seals of SFB, which, in individuals with relatively high contaminant burdens, might include increased rates of infection and anemia. Copyright© Taylor & Francis Inc.
JournalJournal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A
Date2005
Volume68
Issue8
Start page617
End page633
ISSN15287394
Subjects1,1 dichloro 2,2 bis(4 chlorophenyl)ethylene, albumin, globulin, hemoglobin, iron, organohalogen derivative, polybrominated diphenyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyl derivative, anemia, animal experiment, article, blood level, contamination, controlled study, environmental exposure, erythrocyte count, female, health hazard, hematocrit, hematology, immunology, infection, leukocyte count, male, nonhuman, priority journal, reproduction, seal, species habitat, United States, water contamination, Animals, Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Insecticides, Phoca, Polybrominated Biphenyls, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, San Francisco, Water Pollutants, Chemical
NoteCited By (since 1996):22 Marine Mammals, Birds & Turtles, CODEN: JTEHD

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