Coupling propagule output to supply at the edge and interior of a giant kelp forest

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Graham, M. H. (2003). Coupling propagule output to supply at the edge and interior of a giant kelp forest. Ecology, 84(5), 1250-1264.
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TitleCoupling propagule output to supply at the edge and interior of a giant kelp forest
AuthorsM. Graham
AbstractPropagule dispersal is fundamental in regulating the strength of demographic and genetic interactions between individuals both within and among populations. I studied spatiotemporal variability in propagule (zoospore) supply of a continuously reproducing seaweed, giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, to examine: (1) the extent to which local zoospore production is coupled to (correlated with) temporal variability in zoospore supply; and (2) spatial variability in the strength of such coupling. Macrocystis pyrifera planktonic zoospores were quantified from seawater samples pumped on numerous dates in 1999 from just above the substratum at various sites in the Point Loma kelp forest, southern California, USA. Zoospore collections were made at a site in the forest interior approximately three times per month from late February through mid-November. Sample collection overlapped with complete demographic surveys of the local population (100 m2) to determine local reproductive output. Temporal variability in zoospore supply was strongly correlated with relative changes in the density .and size structure of local reproductive adult sporophytes; 76% of variability in zoospore supply was explained by local reproductive output. This tight coupling between zoospore supply and local reproduction appeared to be driven by low-displacement, oscillating currents in the forest interior due to the cumulative drag of adult sporophytes, which kept zoospores close to their release site. High coupling between zoospore supply and local reproduction was validated at two additional interior sites separated by 1 km; 78% of variability in zoospore supply was explained by local reproductive output at these sites. Due to lower sporophyte densities, however, the forest edges experienced rapid, unidirectional currents that appeared to transport zoospores far from their release site, effectively decoupling zoospore supply from local reproduction; only 38% of variability in zoospore supply was explained by local reproductive output at these sites. The results suggest that the size of and location within kelp populations is an important determinant of the importance of local reproduction to zoospore supply due to the effects of flow modification by kelp canopies on zoospore dispersal.
JournalEcology
Date2003
Volume84
Issue5
Start page1250
End page1264
ISSN00129658
Subjectscoupling, dispersal, kelp forest, propagule, spatial variation, temporal variation, California, North America, United States, algae, Halophila, Loma, Macrocystis, Macrocystis pyrifera
NoteCited By (since 1996):27 Seaweeds, CODEN: ECOLA

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