Microsatellite variation, effective population size, and population genetic structure of vermilion snapper, Rhomboplites aurorubens, off the southeastern USA

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Bagley, M. J., Lindquist, D. G., & Geller, J. B. (1999). Microsatellite variation, effective population size, and population genetic structure of vermilion snapper, Rhomboplites aurorubens, off the southeastern USA. Marine Biology, 134(4), 609-620. doi:10.1007/s002270050576
Metadata
TitleMicrosatellite variation, effective population size, and population genetic structure of vermilion snapper, Rhomboplites aurorubens, off the southeastern USA
AuthorsJ. Bagley, G. Lindquist, B. Geller
AbstractVermilion snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens) were collected from four sites off the Atlantic coast of the USA and one site in the Gulf of Mexico to evaluate effective population size and genetic stock structure. Previous studies had suggested geographic variation in the ratio of males to females, so this population characteristic was explored in conjunction with the genetic analysis. Sex ratio varied greatly among the five sample sites; males comprised 57% of samples in the Gulf of Mexico, while within the South Atlantic Bight they comprised between 36% (Morehead City, North Carolina) and 53% (Carolina Beach, North Carolina) of samples. No clear geographic trends in the sex ratio emerged; instead, it was found to vary with fish length, the percentage of males decreasing with increasing size. Allelic variation assessed at seven dinucleotide microsatellite loci was large; gene diversities ranged from 0.43 to 0.95 and allelic counts from 7 to 39. Estimates of the effective population size ranged from 24 500 (based on the infinite-alleles model) to 150 500 (based on the stepwise-mutation model). There was evidence for excess homozygosity within samples: estimates of F(IS) (the correlation of alleles within individuals) ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 among the seven loci, and three estimates were significantly greater than zero. Differentiation among localities was very weak, as estimates of F(ST) (the correlation of alleles within populations) were on the order of 0.001 to 0.002 and genetic distance estimates between localities were not related to geographic distances. This suggested that vermilion snapper in the South Atlantic Bight (Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida) and Gulf of Mexico are likely to consist of one genetic stock. Despite the overall homogeneity, there were indications of a temporally dynamic local structure that would bear further examination.
JournalMarine Biology
Date1999
Volume134
Issue4
Start page609
End page620
ISSN00253162
Subjectsgenetic structure, geographical characteristics, population density, sex ratio, Gulf of Mexico, United States, Rhomboplites aurorubens
NoteCited By (since 1996):33, CODEN: MBIOA

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