The behaviour of iron and other trace elements during the IronEx-I and PlumEx experiments in the Equatorial Pacific

Primary tabs

Gordon, R. M., Johnson, K. S., & Coale, K. H. (1998). The behaviour of iron and other trace elements during the IronEx-I and PlumEx experiments in the Equatorial Pacific. Deep-Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 45(6), 995-1041. doi:10.1016/S0967-0645(98)00012-5
Metadata
TitleThe behaviour of iron and other trace elements during the IronEx-I and PlumEx experiments in the Equatorial Pacific
AuthorsR. Gordon, K. Johnson, K. Coale
AbstractDissolved (< 0.4 μm) and particulate (0.4-5 μm and > 5 μm, leachable and refractory) trace elements were measured during the IronEx I and PlumEx experiments in October and November 1993 near the Galapagos Islands. Iron was measured in the enriched patch and at control stations over a 9 day period following fertilization. The dissolved iron was initially depleted at a rate that gave an iron half-life of 28-40 h. The loss rate gradually decreased, and dissolved iron concentrations did not decrease below about 0.25 nmol kg-1 throughout the experiment. These results were most consistent with a kinetic model that was second order in iron concentration for the scavenging removal of each iron fraction. Other trace elements measured did not change significantly either in concentration or partitioning during the IronEx I experiment. Biological production tracked iron concentrations over time, which suggests that productivity within the fertilized patch was regulated by the availability of iron. The PlumEx study consisted primarily of two transects, a meridional course to the east of the Galapagos Islands and a zonal section to the west. Surface dissolved iron was very low at all stations except those near the Galapagos Islands. Sections of trace metal and other properties distinctly confirm the upwelling of the Equatorial Undercurrent as it intersects the islands. This upwelling has a great effect on the surface distributions of the trace metals on the west side of the islands. Productivity within the mixed layer of this region is highly correlated with iron and nitrate. West of the islands highest productivity is found at stations with the highest iron. North of the Equatorial front, in nitrate-depleted waters, elevated iron concentrations do not enhance productivity.
JournalDeep-Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Date1998
Volume45
Issue6
Start page995
End page1041
ISSN0967-0645
Subjectschemical oceanography, iron, nutrient enrichment, trace element, Pacific Ocean
NoteCited By (since 1996):58, Oceanography, CODEN: DSROE

Bookmark

Bookmarks: