Comparison of marine sediment toxicity test protocols for the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius and the polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

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Anderson, B. S., Hunt, J. W., Phillips, B. M., Tudor, S., Fairey, R., Newman, J., … Tjeerdema, R. S. (1998). Comparison of marine sediment toxicity test protocols for the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius and the polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 17(5), 859-866. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(1998)017<0859:COMSTT>2.3.CO;2
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TitleComparison of marine sediment toxicity test protocols for the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius and the polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata
AuthorsS. Anderson, W. Hunt, M. Phillips, S. Tudor, R. Fairey, J. Newman, M. Puckett, M. Stephenson, R. Long, S. Tjeerdema
AbstractThe 10-d amphipod survival toxicity test protocol using Rhepoxynius abronius was compared to the 20-d polychaete worm growth and survival protocol using Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Of the 341 sediment samples collected in California and tested over a 2-year period, 78% significantly inhibited R. abronius survival, whereas 2 and 26% significantly inhibited N. arenaceodentata survival and biomass, respectively. Statistical power associated with each protocol endpoint was determined by calculating the minimum significant difference (MSD) for each test protocol for this data set. The 90th percentile MSDs for R. abronius survival and N. arenaceodentata survival and biomass were 16, 36, and 56%, respectively. Survival of R. abronius was significantly negatively correlated with a number of toxicants including metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated bipbenyls. No significant correlations were determined between N. arenaceodentata survival or biomass and contaminants measured. Amphipod survival was also negatively correlated with sediment total organic carbon and grain size, but when samples with a high percent fine grain size (>90% fines) were eliminated from consideration, the overall conclusions of the study were not altered. The 10-d amphipod survival protocol using R. abronius was a more sensitive indicator of toxicity, but the results indicate that this was due to greater statistical power rather than greater sensitivity of the test organisms or endpoints.
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Date1998
Volume17
Issue5
Start page859
End page866
ISSN07307268
Subjectssediment toxicity, statistical analysis, survival, toxicity test, article, environmental impact assessment, marine environment, nonhuman, polychaeta, priority journal, sea pollution, sediment, worm, USA, California, Amphipoda, Neanthes arenaceodentata, Nereis, Rhepoxinius, Rhepoxinius abronius, Rhepoxynius abronius
NoteCited By (since 1996):16

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