Organochlorines and other environmental contaminants in muscle tissues of sportfish collected from San Francisco Bay

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Fairey, R., Taberski, K., Lamerdin, S., Johnson, E., Clark, R. P., Downing, J. W., … Petreas, M. (1997). Organochlorines and other environmental contaminants in muscle tissues of sportfish collected from San Francisco Bay. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 34(12), 1058-1071. doi:10.1016/S0025-326X(97)00084-2
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TitleOrganochlorines and other environmental contaminants in muscle tissues of sportfish collected from San Francisco Bay
AuthorsR. Fairey, K. Taberski, S. Lamerdin, E. Johnson, P. Clark, W. Downing, J. Newman, M. Petreas
AbstractEdible fish species were collected from 13 locations throughout San Francisco Bay, during the spring of 1994, for determination of contaminant levels in muscle tissue. Species collected included white croaker, surfperch, leopard and brown smoothhound sharks, striped bass, white sturgeon and halibut. 66 composite tissue samples were analysed for the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, trace elements and dioxin/furans. The US EPA approach to assessing chemical contaminant data for fish tissue consumption was used for identifying the primary chemicals of concern. Six chemicals or chemical groups were found to exceed screening values (SVs) established using the US EPA approach. PCBs (as total Aroclors) exceeded the screening level of 3 ng g -1 in all 66 muscle tissue samples, with the greatest concentrations (638 ng g -1) found near San Francisco's industrial areas. Mercury was elevated (> 0.14 μg g -1) in 40 of 66 samples with the greatest concentrations (1.26 μg g -1) occurring in shark muscle tissues. Concentrations of the organochlorine pesticides dieldrin, total chlordane and total dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exceeded screening levels in a number of samples. Dioxin/furans (as toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQ's)) were elevated (> 0.15 pg g -1) in 15 of the 19 samples analysed. Fish with high lipid content (croaker and surfperch) in their muscle tissue generally exhibited higher organic contaminant levels while fish with low lipid levels (halibut and shark) exhibited lower organic contaminant levels. Tissue samples taken from North Bay stations most often exhibited high levels of chemical contamination. The California Office of Health Hazard Assessment is currently evaluating the results of this study and has issued an interim Health Advisory concerning the human consumption of fish tissue from San Francisco Bay.
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Date1997
Volume34
Issue12
Start page1058
End page1071
ISSN0025326X
Subjectschlordane, chlorphenotane, dieldrin, lipid, mercury, organochlorine pesticide, polychlorinated biphenyl, polychlorinated dibenzodioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, trace element, bioconcentration, chemical pollutants, game fish, organochlorines, animal tissue, article, bass, bioaccumulation, biological monitoring, ecotoxicology, fish, muscle tissue, nonhuman, sea pollution, shark, united states, USA, California, San Francisco Bay
NoteCited By (since 1996):61, CODEN: MPNBA

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