Swarming benthic crustaceans in the Bering and Chukchi seas and their relation to geographic patterns in gray whale feeding

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Kim, S. L., & Oliver, J. S. (1989). Swarming benthic crustaceans in the Bering and Chukchi seas and their relation to geographic patterns in gray whale feeding. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 67(6), 1531-1542.
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TitleSwarming benthic crustaceans in the Bering and Chukchi seas and their relation to geographic patterns in gray whale feeding
AuthorsS. Kim, J. Oliver
AbstractSwarms differed in their geographic extent, local biomass, and life stages of swarming individuals and thus in their availability to feeding Eschrichtius robustus. Immature amphipods apparently swarmed for dispersal, whereas cumaceans probably swarmed for mating. All life stages of the hyperbenthic mysids occurred above the sea floor. Although the geographic spread of mysid swarms and shrimp communities was much greater than for the amphipod and cumacean swarms, the latter swarmed in denser patches to produce higher local biomass. Crustacean swarms are important in describing the geographic patterns of gray whale feeding from the Chukchi Sea to Baja California. The primary feeding ground is in the S Chukchi Sea and especially the N Bering Sea, where gray whales suck infaunal amphipods from fine sand. The primary feeding ground is divided into a relatively deep zone (>20 m), where tube-dwelling ampeliscid amphipods are the major prey, and a shallow zone (<20 m), where burrowing pontoporeid amphipods dominate. The secondary feeding ground is in the S Bering Sea along the E Alaska Peninsula and adjacent Alaskan mainland where shrimp and mysids are the major prey. -from Authors
JournalCanadian Journal of Zoology
Date1989
Volume67
Issue6
Start page1531
End page1542
ISSN0008-4301
SubjectsCrustacea, grey whale, whale, Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, Ampeliscidae, Amphipoda, Cetacea, Cumacea, Decapoda (Crustacea), Eschrichtiidae, Eschrichtius robustus, Mysidae
NoteCited By (since 1996):16, Invertebrates, Marine Mammals, Birds & Turtles

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