Behavioral ecology of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Pacific Northwest

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Heimlich-Boran, J. R. (1988). Behavioral ecology of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Pacific Northwest. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 66(3), 565-578.
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TitleBehavioral ecology of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Pacific Northwest
AuthorsJ. Heimlich-Boran
AbstractResident killer whales fed more in areas of high relief subsurface topography along salmon migratory routes, and may use these geographic features to increase feeding efficiency. Transient whales fed in shallow protected areas around concentrations of their prey, harbor seals Phoca vitulina. Whales traveled across deep, featureless areas in moving from one feeding area to another. Whales rested depending on the previous sequence of behaviors and played in open water areas or adjacent to feeding areas. Location of food resources and habitats suitable for prey capture appears to be the prime determining factor in the behavioral ecology of these whales, most likely representing cultural mechanisms that have been learned through trial and error experiences leading to successful foraging strategies.
JournalCanadian Journal of Zoology
Date1988
Volume66
Issue3
Start page565
End page578
ISSN0008-4301
Subjectsharbor seal, killer whales, seal, whale, Pacific(Northeast), Orcinus orca, Phoca vitulina
NoteCited By (since 1996):34, Marine Mammals, Birds & Turtles

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