Bacterial chemolithotrophy in the ocean is associated with sinking particles

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Karl, D. M., Knauer, G. A., Martin, J. H., & Ward, B. B. (1984). Bacterial chemolithotrophy in the ocean is associated with sinking particles. Nature, 309(5963), 54-56. doi:10.1038/309054a0
Metadata
TitleBacterial chemolithotrophy in the ocean is associated with sinking particles
AuthorsD. Karl, G. Knauer, J. Martin, B. Ward
AbstractThe oceanic carbon cycle has traditionally been viewed as a reversible, one step reduction-oxidation reaction (CO 2CH 2O). Principle pathways were thought to involve eukaryotic photoautotrophy and oxygen-dependent bacterial respiration, respectively. However, prokaryotic (cyanobacterial) photoautotrophy is now well documented and has even been proposed as a major carbon pathway 1-6. In a previous study of the mesopelagic zone in the North Pacific Ocean 7, the observed downward fluxes of organic carbon, nitrogen, ATP and RNA suggested production in situ of new particulate organic carbon at 700-900 m. Here we present evidence that this is indeed the case and that it is mediated by bacterial chemolithotrophy. Energy for this process may be in part provided by detrital NH + 4 derived from the downward flux of large particles. © 1984 Nature Publishing Group.
JournalNature
Date1984
Volume309
Issue5963
Start page54
End page56
ISSN0028-0836
Subjects80, Cyanobacteria., Pacific Ocean
NoteCited By (since 1996):33, Oceanography

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