Comparative survivorship and life history of painted greenling (Oxylebius pictus) in Puget Sound, Washington and Monterey Bay, California

Primary tabs

DeMartini, E. E., & Anderson, M. E. (1980). Comparative survivorship and life history of painted greenling (Oxylebius pictus) in Puget Sound, Washington and Monterey Bay, California. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 5(1), 33-47. doi:10.1007/BF00000948
Metadata
TitleComparative survivorship and life history of painted greenling (Oxylebius pictus) in Puget Sound, Washington and Monterey Bay, California
AuthorsE. DeMartini, E. Anderson
AbstractThe painted greenling, Oxylebius pictus, a hexagrammid fish of shallow, northeastern Pacific rocky habitats was observed and collected near the center of its range at Monterey Bay, California, and near the northern limit of its distribution at Puget Sound. Life history characteristics were compared for breeding stocks from the two areas. Mean and maximum adult body sizes (lengths and wet weights) and longevities of both sexes are greater at Puget Sound. Also, both males and females reach sexual maturity at a smaller body length at Monterey. Age group 0 and I juveniles are twice as abundant as adults at Monterey but rare at Puget Sound. Monterey females have greater relative fecundities. Egg development rates are similar at equivalent temperatures; eggs are smaller, however, at Monterey, and thus embryos are smaller at hatching. Length increase is faster for Puget Sound juveniles; adult fish in the two areas grow in length at comparable rates, although weight per body length is consistently greater for Monterey fish. These findings reflect a poorer survivorship at Monterey, where natural predation on fertilized eggs and the mortality rates of adult males are greater. © 1980 Dr. W. Junk B.V. Publishers.
JournalEnvironmental Biology of Fishes
Date1980
Volume5
Issue1
Start page33
End page47
ISSN03781909
NoteCited By (since 1996):7 Fish and Fisheries, CODEN: EBFID

Bookmark

Bookmarks: