Interactive effects of polyculture, feeding rate, and stocking density on growth of juvenile shellfish

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Hunt, J. W., Foster, M. S., Nybakken, J. W., Larson, R. J., & Ebert, E. E. (1995). Interactive effects of polyculture, feeding rate, and stocking density on growth of juvenile shellfish. Journal of Shellfish Research, 14(1), 191-197.
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TitleInteractive effects of polyculture, feeding rate, and stocking density on growth of juvenile shellfish
AuthorsW. Hunt, S. Foster, W. Nybakken, J. Larson, E. Ebert
AbstractGrowth rates were evaluated for juvenile red abalone Haliotis rufescens (Swainson), mussels Mytilus californianus (Conrad), and spot prawns Panda/us platyceras (Brandt) cultured in monocultures and polycultures at 3 feeding rates. Two polyculture stocking densities were employed, one in which each species was at the same density as in monoculture, for a combined density of 4.6 g shellfish per liter, and another in which the combined density was the same as for a single species in monoculture (approximately 2.3 g/L). All culture groups were fed at 3 levels: unfiltered seawater only, and unfiltered seawater plus 2 different quantities of benthic diatoms (0.25 or 0.50 g dry weight/week), phytoplankton (10 or 50 X 103 cells/mL), and diced shrimp (3 or 10% of prawn weight per day). Feeding rate and culture treatment produced a significant interactive effect on shellfish growth (ANOVA p < 0.001). Abalone growth was significantly greater in monoculture than in either the lower or higher density polyculture (mean individual weight increase = 0.48, 0.33 and 0.28 g, respectively). Likewise, prawn growth was significantly greater in monoculture than in either polyculture (0.72, 0.44 and 0.41, respectively). Growth increased significantly with amount of food supplied: mean abalone weight increased 0.15 gin the lowest feeding treatment vs 0.60 gin the highest, and mean prawn weight increased 0.21 gin the lowest feeding treatment vs 0.88 g in the highest. Mussel growth (0.04 g) was restricted by food availability at all feeding rates, and was not significantly affected by any experimental manipulations. Despite expected differences in feeding habits among the 3 species, abalone were found to be capable of ingesting and assimilating diced shrimp that was intended as food for prawns in the polyculture system. Sequential polyculture is proposed as an alternative to combined culture for pilot-scale applications.
JournalJournal of Shellfish Research
Date1995
Volume14
Issue1
Start page191
End page197

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