From a sea of phenotypic traits, fast reaction and boldness emerge as the most influential to survival in marine fish

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Hamilton, S. L. (2018). From a sea of phenotypic traits, fast reaction and boldness emerge as the most influential to survival in marine fish. Functional Ecology, 32(4), 856-857. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.13070
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TitleFrom a sea of phenotypic traits, fast reaction and boldness emerge as the most influential to survival in marine fish
AuthorsS. Hamilton
AbstractPredation is arguably the most consequential of ecological interactions in determining fitness and thus natural selection; prey that do not escape a predator encounter become dinner and can no longer pass their genes on to the next generation. For organisms with complex life histories (e.g. plants, insects, amphibians, marine fish, invertebrates and algae; Wilbur, 1980), processes occurring during transitions between life stages are particularly important for subsequent survival and reproduction (e.g. Berven, 1990; Johnson, Grorud‐Colvert, Sponaugle, & Semmens, 2014; Pechenik, 2006). Mortality is intense at these vulnerable developmental stages (Almany & Webster, 2006; Hjort, 1914), especially when those life‐history transitions involve a habitat shift (i.e. pelagic larva to benthic‐associated juvenile for marine species) where individuals are naïve about new predators and other risks. In marine systems, early results showed that bigger, faster growing, or better‐conditioned individuals were more likely to survive the larval‐juvenile transition (Hamilton, Regetz, & Warner, 2008; Hoey & McCormick, 2004; Searcy & Sponaugle, 2001; Vigliola & Meekan, 2002). Understanding which individuals survive periods of selective mortality, from birth to reproduction, remains fundamental to our understanding of both demographic and evolutionary processes.
JournalFunctional Ecology
Date2018-04-06
Volume32
Issue4
Start page856
End page857
ISSN0269-8463

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