The effects of storm-drains with periodic flows on intertidal algal assemblages in 'Ewa Beach (O'ahu), Hawai'i

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Cox, T. E., & Foster, M. S. (2013). The effects of storm-drains with periodic flows on intertidal algal assemblages in 'Ewa Beach (O'ahu), Hawai'i. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 70(1), 162-170. doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2013.02.029
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TitleThe effects of storm-drains with periodic flows on intertidal algal assemblages in 'Ewa Beach (O'ahu), Hawai'i
AuthorsT. Cox, M. Foster
AbstractStorm-water drainage systems have potential to collect and focus nutrient enriched runoff into coastal systems. Storm-drain effluent could support macroalgal production and result in altered communities. To test this hypothesis, we assessed species composition and percent cover of native and non-native benthic macroalgae at eight intertidal sites along 'Ewa Beach, Hawai'i. Three sites contain storm-drainage outlets (drain 16-52. acres) that deliver effluent into the intertidal zone whereas five sites were located ≥ 100. m away and served as comparisons to determine differences related to the presence of storm-water. Results revealed lush and diverse macroalgal assemblages, similar at all sites. Furthermore, the abundance of non-native species (Acanthophora spicifera, Hypnea musciformis) was not related to presence of storm-drains. The finding that macroalgal assemblages are not related to storm-waters is contrary to an earlier investigation in the same location and underscores the importance of sampling design and habitat variation when assessing impacts. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Date2013
Volume70
Issue1-2
Start page162
End page170
ISSN0025326X
SubjectsAbundance, Diversity, Drainage systems, Habitat variation, Non-native, Non-native species, Nutrient pollution, Species composition, Algae, Beaches, Effluents, Importance sampling, Nutrients, Storms, storm water, algal bloom, coastal zone, community composition, effluent, intertidal environment, marine pollution, native species, nutrient dynamics, species diversity, Acanthophora spicifera, algal community, article, controlled study, echinoderm, environmental impact assessment, Hypnea musciformis, macroalga, marine environment, nonhuman, population abundance, seashore, species richness, United States, water pollution, water supply, Drainage, Sanitary, Environmental Monitoring, Hawaii, Seaweed, Waste Disposal, Fluid, Water Movements, Water Pollutants, Weather, Ewa Beach, Hawaii [United States], Hawaiian Islands, Oahu
NoteSeaweeds, CODEN: MPNBA

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