Geographic variation in trace-element signatures in the statoliths of near-hatch larvae and recruits of Concholepas concholepas (loco)

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Manríquez, P. H., Galaz, S. P., Opitz, T., Hamilton, S., Paradis, G., Warner, R. R., … Lagos, N. A. (2012). Geographic variation in trace-element signatures in the statoliths of near-hatch larvae and recruits of Concholepas concholepas (loco). Marine Ecology Progress Series, 448, 105-118. doi:10.3354/meps09514
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TitleGeographic variation in trace-element signatures in the statoliths of near-hatch larvae and recruits of Concholepas concholepas (loco)
AuthorsP. Manríquez, S. Galaz, T. Opitz, S. Hamilton, G. Paradis, R. Warner, J. Castilla, F. Labra, N. Lagos
AbstractSpatial variation of trace elements in calcified structures (otoliths, statoliths, and shells) has been used to track the movements of individuals among habitats, and connectivity between marine populations. In the present study, we used laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentrations of trace elements in statoliths of prehatch larvae and recruits of the gastropod Concholepas concholepas from 3 regions in Chile. We also examined spatial variation in chemical signatures deposited during larval life and at the time of settlement in intertidal habitats. We found significant differences between 3 geographic regions in the trace element concentrations recorded in natal statoliths of near-hatch larvae and in natal core and edge areas of recruit statoliths. Discriminant function analysis indicates that natal signatures of near-hatch larvae and the cores and edges of recruit statoliths show spatial segregation among regions. High levels of reclassification success of larvae to the origin region suggest potential for assigning recruits to the corresponding matching region. Concentrations of trace elements in the natal cores of recruit statoliths fell relatively close but did not overlap with the discriminant space occupied by larvae, and at regional scales the pattern of geographic variation of recruit statoliths resembles that of larval statoliths. This suggests population grouping and little population interchange at this regional scale. Assessing population stocks and connectivity of this species at smaller scales along the Chilean coast will only be possible with more finely structured sampling and a better understanding of temporal variation in the chemical environment. © Inter-Research 2012.
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Date2012
Start page105
End page118
ISSN01718630
Subjectsassessment method, discriminant analysis, geographical region, habitat type, hatching, intertidal environment, larva, marine environment, mass spectrometry, plasma, population structure, recruitment (population dynamics), snail, spatial variation, statolith, temporal variation, trace element, Concholepas, Concholepas concholepas, Gastropoda
NoteCODEN: MESED

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