Benthic changes at McMurdo Station, Antarctica following local sewage treatment and regional iceberg-mediated productivity decline

Primary tabs

Conlan, K. E., Kim, S. L., Thurber, A. R., & Hendrycks, E. (2010). Benthic changes at McMurdo Station, Antarctica following local sewage treatment and regional iceberg-mediated productivity decline. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 60(3), 419-432. doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2009.10.009
Metadata
TitleBenthic changes at McMurdo Station, Antarctica following local sewage treatment and regional iceberg-mediated productivity decline
AuthorsK. Conlan, S. Kim, A. Thurber, E. Hendrycks
AbstractMcMurdo Station, the largest research station in Antarctica, ceased on-site garbage dumping in 1988 and initiated sewage treatment in 2003. In 2003-2004 its sea-ice regime was altered by the massive B-15A and C-19 iceberg groundings in the Ross Sea, approximately 100 km distant. Here we follow macrofaunal response to these changes relative to a baseline sampled since 1988. In the submarine garbage dump, surface contaminants levels have declined but associated macrofaunal recolonization is not yet evident. Although sewage-associated macrofauna were still abundant around the outfall nearly 2 yr after initiation of treatment, small changes downcurrent as far as 434 m from the outfall suggest some community recovery. Widespread community changes in 2003-2004, not seen in the decade previously, suggests that the benthos collectively responded to major changes in sea-ice regime and phytoplankton production caused by the iceberg groundings. Crown Copyright © 2009.
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Date2010
Volume60
Issue3
Start page419
End page432
ISSN0025-326X
SubjectsAfter initiation, Antarctica, Macrofauna, Re-colonization, Research stations, Ross Sea, Surface contaminants, Outfalls, Sea ice, Sewage, Sewage treatment, heavy metal, hydrocarbon, benthos, fauna, iceberg, marine pollution, phytoplankton, recolonization, sewage outfall, article, benthic fauna, Capitella perarmata, community structure, controlled study, environmental change, environmental recolonization, nonhuman, Ophryotrocha notialis, population abundance, sea pollution, species composition, species distribution, Antarctic Regions, Biodiversity, Environmental Monitoring, Global Warming, Ice Cover, Seawater, Waste Disposal, Fluid, Water Pollutants, Water Pollution, East Antarctica, McMurdo Station, Southern Ocean
NoteCited By (since 1996):9, Invertebrates, Antarctica, CODEN: MPNBA

Bookmark

Bookmarks: