Comparing sea level response at Monterey, California from the 1989 Loma prieta earthquake and the 1964 great Alaskan earthquake

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Breaker, L. C., Murty, T. S., Norton, J. G., & Carroll, D. (2009). Comparing sea level response at Monterey, California from the 1989 Loma prieta earthquake and the 1964 great Alaskan earthquake. Science of Tsunami Hazards, 28(5), 255-271.
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TitleComparing sea level response at Monterey, California from the 1989 Loma prieta earthquake and the 1964 great Alaskan earthquake
AuthorsC. Breaker, S. Murty, G. Norton, D. Carroll
AbstractTwo of the largest earthquakes to affect water levels in Monterey Bay in recent years were the Loma Prieta Earthquake (LPE) of 1989 with a moment magnitude of 6.9, and the Great Alaskan Earthquake (GAE) of 1964 with a moment magnitude of 9.2. In this study, we compare the sea level response of these events with a primary focus on their frequency content and how the bay affected it, itself. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) was employed to extract the primary frequencies associated with each event. It is not clear how or exactly where the tsunami associated with the LPE was generated, but it occurred inside the bay and most likely began to take on the characteristics of a seiche by the time it reached the tide gauge in Monterey Harbor. Results of the SSA decomposition revealed two primary periods of oscillation, 9-10 minutes, and 31-32 minutes. The first oscillation is in agreement with the range of periods for the expected natural oscillations of Monterey Harbor, and the second oscillation is consistent with a bay-wide oscillation or seiche mode. SSA decomposition of the GAE revealed several sequences of oscillations all with a period of approximately 37 minutes, which corresponds to the predicted, and previously observed, transverse mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay. In this case, it appears that this tsunami produced quarter-wave resonance within the bay consistent with its seiche-like response. Overall, the sea level responses to the LPE and GAE differed greatly, not only because of the large difference in their magnitudes but also because the driving force in one case occurred inside the bay (LPE), and in the second, outside the bay (GAE). As a result, different modes of oscillation were excited.
JournalScience of Tsunami Hazards
Date2009
Volume28
Issue5
Start page255
End page271
ISSN87556839
NoteCited By (since 1996):4

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